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Why action is needed now

Why action is needed now

At no time in the history of medicine has the growth in knowledge and technologies been so profound. The new technology and innovation indeed open a new horizon in improvement of the care, increase in the longevity and alleviating pain and suffering. Advances in rehabilitation, cell restoration, and prosthetic devices hold potential for improving the health and functioning of many with disabilities. Mankind should be proud of great strides that have been made in the health and medical sciences. The flip side of it is that with the advent of technology, complexities and high risk factor has grown profoundly. Research reveals that this is because the healthcare system frequently falls short in its ability to translate knowledge into practice and fail to apply the new technology safely and appropriately. This result into overuse, underuse, misuse of the healthcare services and subsequently this conclude into loss of life, major or minor impairments, pain and suffering. The end is not yet; this further result millions of dollar extra burden on patient and family.

During the last decade alone, more than 70 publications in leading peer-reviewed journals have documented serious quality shortcoming within the healthcare delivery system. Overuse and misuse of the healthcare service are to large extend preventable which indeed improve the quality and lower the cost of the healthcare services through better know-how, training and understanding of the clinical tools.

Medical education has traditionally taken the form of an apprenticeship. Students are often encouraged to learn based on the principle of see one, do one, teach one. This is rarely an appropriate method of ensuring safe health care. It also reinforces a culture in which training is not prioritized. Poorly trained health-care workers can be a major contributing factor leading to adverse events. Staff may not be well placed to judge their own level of competence; they may also be overconfident as a consequence of their own limited experience. Education deserves a higher profile within health-care provision.

Education and validation of competency are critical components in the quest to improve patient safety. At the very least, all health-care workers must be competent to deliver safe care, and their organization must have mechanisms to check this. Education needs to be broadened to include explicit patient safety topics, such as human factors, and methods, such as simulation, designed to create a generation of health-care workers who deliver consistently safe care.

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